News

Image of a measurement from the program.

2015.06.29 |

A single molecule in the building blocks of life

The world is built up of molecules that join together and form different building blocks. New software makes it easier to zoom right in to the individual molecule.

2015.07.01 |

Engineering students can stop driving instructors from cheating

A new software system can ensure the quality of driving lessons in Denmark. Engineering students at Aarhus University are responsible for a finished and tested product that can put an end to document fraud in the branch.

2015.06.29 |

Danish wolves prefer deer as their main course

Danish wolves feed mainly on roe deer, fallow deer and red deer, according to a study of 42 wolf droppings collected mostly in Central Jutland. Links to three articles in Danish with English summaries (click on ‘Artiklen’).

The Villum Research Station in Greenland will be inaugurated on 8 July 2015. Photo: Stephan Bernberg

2015.06.26 |

Iinauguration of Denmark’s and Greenland’s most northerly research station

The Villum Research Station in Greenland is set to be officially inaugurated on 8 July 2015. The Arctic research station, which primarily deals with climate research, is located north of the Arctic Circle in the north-eastern corner of Greenland.

<em>Aurora</em> – Aarhus University’s research vessel. Photo: Aarhus University.

2015.06.24 |

Students to study the special current conditions in Denmark’s Little Belt

Nine biology students will spend this week on board Aarhus University’s ultra-modern research vessel – the Aurora. They will be taking a close look at a dramatic current phenomenon that can possibly provide an explanation of the many fish and the large population of porpoises in the Little Belt.

Professor Søren Fournais, Department of Mathematics.

2015.06.23 |

DFF Advanced Grant awarded to professor of mathematics

The Danish Council for Independent Research (DFF) has awarded an Advanced Grant of DKK 12 million from the Sapere Aude programme 2015 to Professor Søren Fournais, Department of Mathematics.

Associate Professor Simon Albrecht, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University.

2015.06.23 |

DFF Starting Grant for research into binary star systems

The Danish Council for Independent Research (DFF) has awarded a grant of DKK 5.4 million from the Sapere Aude programme to Associate Professor Simon Albrecht, Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Associate Professor Samuel Schindler, Centre for Science Studies, Department of Mathematics.

2015.06.23 |

DFF Starting Grant to study intuition in science

The Danish Council for Independent Research (DFF) has awarded a grant of DKK 7 million from the Sapere Aude programme to Associate Professor Samuel Schindler, Centre for Science Studies, Department of Mathematics.

2015.06.22 |

Legumes control infection of nodules by both symbiotic and endophytic bacteria

New research results show that legume plants selectively regulate access and accommodation of both symbiotic and endophytic bacteria inside root nodule. This provides a solid basis and platform for identification and selection of beneficial endophytic bacteria and highly efficient nitrogen-fixing rhizobia to be used as biofertilisers in…

2015.06.18 |

Underwater robot can provide new knowledge about the North Pole

Two engineering students are responsible for a new robot that can investigate what is hidden beneath the ice in the most impassable areas of the Arctic. They have reached the finals of the global university competition in underwater robotics being held soon in Canada.

Klaus Lønne Ingvartsen continues as head of the Department of Animal Science at AU Foulum.

2015.06.15 |

Head of the Department of Animal Science continues for a further period

Klaus Lønne Ingvartsen has been appointed for a further period as head of the Department of Animal Science at AU Foulum.

2015.06.15 |

Twenty years of Arctic research puts Denmark on the world map

In 1995, visionary researchers established the Zackenberg Research Station in North-East Greenland to monitor climate change in the area. This is precisely described twenty years later in a unique data set.

NB! Click on the image to see it in full size. The image shows which parts of the GlpG protein are the first to fold in the transition state (TS). The greener it is, the more coloured it gets. White shows that there is no structure in the TS, while red shows that this part of the protein has ‘overfolded’. Left: the actual 3D structure of the protein. Right: here the individual amino acid residues are shown in a model overview of the protein, where all 6 transmembrane helices (TM1–6) are visible, as well as the two helices (H1–2) and the loop, which is sticking out of the cell membrane.

2015.06.09 |

All folding is good when it gets off to a good start

Aarhus researchers are behind the most detailed description of how membrane protein folds. This provides new knowledge about the wonderful world of membrane proteins.

PhD student Jakob Thyrring doing fieldwork in North-West Greenland, where he has collected hundreds of samples (photo: Martin Blicher, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources).
Jakob Thyrring, Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, has previously shared his knowledge. Here he talks to a crew from TV2 about Arctic mussels (photo: Peter Bondo, Aarhus University).

2015.06.09 |

Prestigious international distinction to PhD student at the Arctic Research Centre

When Jakob Thyrring took off for Washington, he was flying in more ways than one. The talented PhD student is the only Danish representative taking part in the large-scale, three-week-long International Visitor Leadership Program in the USA.

Eelgrass is a key component of Danish coastal waters. After many years of decline, it finally looks as though there are more and larger eelgrass meadows in the shallow water. (Photo: Peter Bondo Christensen)
The amount of nitrogen and phosphorus in the inner Danish coastal waters began to fall immediately after the aquatic environment plans were introduced. It is thus possible to control nutrients by regulating the Danish sources. No major development has occurred in light and oxygen conditions, but the light conditions in particular have improved during the last five years. A warmer climate and less wind in the summer strengthen the stratification of Danish waters.
Fewer nutrients in the inner Danish waters mean fewer planktonic algae – a target for chlorophyll. This ultimately means less food for the mussels on the sea bed. An increased distribution of eelgrass has only been seen in the last five years, while the large algae – seaweed – spread more rapidly via spores when the light conditions are just slightly better.

2015.06.04 |

Aquatic environment plans work – Danish marine environment improving

Aarhus University researchers have analysed data regarding environmental conditions in the Danish coastal areas during the last 30 years. The results show that the Danish Action Plan for the Aquatic Environment has led to a marked decrease in the amount of nutrients in the inner Danish waters. At long last, this provides plentiful marine life, but…

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