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Maize is a crop that will find things more and more difficult as climate change gives us more drought during the summer. Here is a Danish maize field from July 2018. Photo: Janne Hansen

2018.10.16 |

Climate changes require better adaptation to drought

Europe’s future climate will be characterised by more frequent heat waves and more widespread drought. Heat and drought will both challenge crop production, but drought in particular will be a problem – especially for spring sown crops such as maize.

Sustainable forest management in Europe has only a modest effect on mitigating global climate change. Photo: Janne Hansen

2018.10.16 |

Can forests save us from climate change?

A new study published in Nature has found that managing Europe’s forests to maximise carbon sequestration has a negligible effect on the global climate.

Alexandre Anesio has been appointed a professor in Arctic biochemistry at the Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, from 1 November 2018. (Private photo).

2018.10.12 |

New professor researches microbial life on the surface of ice

Alexandre Anesio has been appointed Professor in Arctic Biogeochemistry at the Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University from 1 November 2018. He comes from a position at the University of Bristol.

2018.10.12 |

Goldilocks principle in biology – fine-tuning the ‘just right’ signal load

In the fairy tale "Goldilock and the Three Bears", the girl Goldilock goes to the bears’ house where she finds three bowls of porridge, but only one has the “just right” temperature, and in the same way within biology, you can find the "just right" conditions - called the Goldilocks principle.

A hoverfly (marked with a red square) pollinating white dryas in southern Greenland. The original idea is to use cameras with automatic insect recognition to register how climate change is affecting the interaction between plants and pollinating insects. Photo: Toke Thomas Høye
Toke Thomas Høye, senior researcher. Photo: Aarhus University

2018.10.11 |

Climate researcher from Aarhus University honoured for the original research idea of the year

Toke Thomas Høye, a senior researcher at the Department of Bioscience, becomes the first recipient of a new award from the Independent Research Fund Denmark for this year's original research idea.

Jacob Sherson has been awarded the Grundfos Prize for 2018. (Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Photo.)

2018.10.12 |

Bigger. More. Better.

Professor with special responsibilities Jacob Sherson has a mission; he want to reinvent the way computers and humans interact. He’s reinvented himself a few times along the way, and today he says he’s a sort of version 3.0 of himself. The physicist has now been awarded the 2018 Grundfos Prize of DKK 1 mill. for his work on the interface between…

The students here are building mini drones under expert supervision from Associate Professor Erdal Kayacan. Photo: Jesper Bruun.

2018.10.11 |

Sustainability on the curriculum for 370 pupils

Perhaps the Danish high-school students who know most about sustainability. At all events, 370 students from Aarhus Tech now know a little more after hearing about the latest knowledge and technology last Friday at a theme day at Aarhus University.

At the AU annual celebration in 2015, Sir Gregory Winter was appointed an honorary doctor at Aarhus University following a nomination from Science and Technology. He was presented with the doctorate by Dean Niels Christian Nielsen, Science and Technology. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Photo.

2018.10.09 |

Honorary doctor at Aarhus University receives Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Sir Gregory Winter has been awarded a quarter of this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on antibodies. He has been working with AU researchers for many years, and in 2015 he was appointed an honorary doctor at Aarhus University, Science and Technology.

Researchers from Aarhus University have developed an improved method for following the transport of chemicals through the soil. Photo: Janne Hansen

2018.10.03 |

Following the path of chemicals through the soil

A new and quick way to predict the transport of chemicals through the soil has been developed by researchers at Aarhus University.

In some areas, killer whales feed primarily on sea mammals and big fish like tuna and sharks and are then threatened by PCBs. In areas where the killer whales primarily feed on small fish like herring, they are less threatened. Photo: Audun Rikardsen – www.audunrikardsen.com
In areas where the killer whales primarily feed on small fish like herring, they are less threatened. Photo: Audun Rikardsen – www.audunrikardsen.com
Killer whales hunt together to gather fish in big, isolated schools. Photo: Audun Rikardsen – www.audunrikardsen.com
PCB transport in the food chains: When foreign hazardous substances enter the marine environment, they are assimilated into the first link in the food chain, phytoplankton. The phytoplankton is consumed by zooplankton, which in turn is consumed by smaller fish, etc. The chemicals accumulate in each link of the food chain, and this means that killer whales that feed on large animals in contaminated areas may contain concentrations of PCBs so high that the survival of the species is threatened. Killer whales that primarily feed on smaller fish are not threatened in the same way. 
Population development: By collecting data from around the world and loading them into population models, the researchers can see that 10 out of 19 populations of killer whales are affected by high levels of PCBs in their body. PCBs particularly affect the reproduction and immune system of the whales. The situation is worst in the oceans around Brazil and the UK where the model predicts that populations have been cut in half over the first decades since the use of PCBs became widespread. Here, the models predict a high risk that the species will disappear within a 30-40-year period. The line indicates median values, while the shaded field shows the variation.

2018.11.01 |

PCB pollution threatens to wipe out killer whales

More than forty years after the first initiatives were taken to ban the use of PCBs, the chemical pollutants remain a deadly threat to animals at the top of the food chain. A new study, just published in the journal Science, shows that the current concentrations of PCBs can lead to the disappearance of half of the world’s populations of killer…

Figure: Katharina Markmann.

2018.09.25 |

How leaves talk to roots

New findings show that a micro RNA from the shoot keeps legume roots susceptible to symbiotic infection by downregulating a gene that would otherwise hinder root responses to symbiotic bacteria. These findings help us understand what it takes to make nitrogen-fixing symbiosis efficient, and what we need to do to exploit it agronomically.

Professor Carsten Obel from the Department of Public Health (left) and Professor Kaj Grønbæk from the Department of Computer Science will be working with public and private sector players on innovative approaches to prevention and treatment in the Danish health service. Photo: Melissa B. Kirkeby Yildirim - AU Foto

2018.09.25 |

Project to promote health using data from the patients' smartphones

A new interdisciplinary research project aims at promoting health by analysing up-to-the-minute data, for example from patients' smartphones, and statistical data from the healthcare system. With DKK 20 mill. from Innovation Fund Denmark, two professors, one in public health and one in computer science, will be joining a number of companies,…

[Translate to English:] Foto: Lars Kruse, AU Foto

2018.09.24 |

Competitive tendering for research-based public-sector consultancy postponed

Competitive tendering postponed for one year.

Figure: Søren Lykke-Andersen.

2018.09.19 |

Co-evolution between a "parasite gene" and its host

A Danish research team has delineated a complex symbiosis between a ‘parasitic’ noncoding RNA gene and its protein coding ‘host’ gene in human cells.

2018.09.17 |

Advanced fluorescence microscopy reveals new aspects of protein pathways on the ribosome

The protein called translation elongation factor EF-Tu is a well-known player in the protein synthesis process. A new scientific article describes novel aspects of this well-described protein, which appears to play an even more important role in securing the accuracy of translation than previously assumed. The results may have an influence on the…

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