News

Figure: Søren Lykke-Andersen.

2018.09.19 |

Co-evolution between a "parasite gene" and its host

A Danish research team has delineated a complex symbiosis between a ‘parasitic’ noncoding RNA gene and its protein coding ‘host’ gene in human cells.

2018.09.17 |

Advanced fluorescence microscopy reveals new aspects of protein pathways on the ribosome

The protein called translation elongation factor EF-Tu is a well-known player in the protein synthesis process. A new scientific article describes novel aspects of this well-described protein, which appears to play an even more important role in securing the accuracy of translation than previously assumed. The results may have an influence on the…

2018.09.17 |

Evolutionary biologist Tove Hedegaard Jørgensen awarded Prize of Honour for Pedagogics

Associate Professor Tove Hedegaard Jørgensen from the Department of Bioscience and ST Learning Lab has been awarded the The Aarhus University Anniversary Foundation Prize of Honour for Pedagogics in recognition of outstanding and groundbreaking teaching. The award is accompanied by a DKK 100,000 monetary award.

2018.09.17 |

Student of IT product development awarded Her Majesty Queen Margrethe II’s Travel Grant

At Aarhus University's annual celebration 2018, Karl-Emil Bilstrup, who is a master's degree student in IT product development, was awarded Her Majesty Queen Margrethe II’s Travel Grant of DKK 25,000. Read more about him and the other three award winners.

2018.09.17 |

Populations geneticist awarded honorary doctorate at AU

Professor Andrew G. Clark from Cornell University has been awarded an honorary doctorate from Aarhus University for his impressive research work on population genetics and genomics over the last 40 years.

You have to go against the flow and turn ideas upside down if you want to attract the attention of the VILLUM Experiment programme. Eight AU researchers have been able to do just this, and together they will be receiving DKK 15.3 million. (Ill: Colourbox)

2018.09.18 |

Experiments worth millions

The Villum Foundation is supporting bold technical and scientific research ideas for the second time. Researchers from Aarhus University are again on the list of recipients, with eight daring ideas totalling DKK 15.3 million.

AU researchers have completed a new successful screening strategy where they have identified novel inhibitors of αlpha-synuclein aggregation. This may help develop a cure for Parkinson's disease. (Image: Colourbox.com)
Graphical overview of a screening of 746,000 compounds for inhibitory effects of alpha-synuclein aggregation. (Graphics: Professor Daniel Otzen)

2018.09.11 |

New high-throughput screening study may pave the way for future Parkinson’s disease therapy

Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease; currently there is no cure. Aggregation of the protein α-synuclein plays a key role in this disease. Together with a US drug company, AU researchers have now carried out a new screening strategy which has identified novel and structurally diverse aggregation inhibitors.

2018.09.10 |

Molecular switches are not just "on" or "off"

It is not always easy to see if a switch is on or off! A new study shows that the same can be true of a molecular switch. This knowledge gives a new insight into the molecular switches, the GTPases, many of which have medical potential.

Professor Poul Nissen (Photo: The Carlsberg Foundation)

2018.09.03 |

Poul Nissen awarded the Carlsberg Foundation Research Prize 2018

Poul Nissen receives the Carlsberg Foundation Research Prize for his groundbreaking work in structural biology. The prize was given by HRH the Crown Princess, Minister of Higher Education and Science, Tommy Ahlers, and chairman of the Carlsberg Foundation, Flemming Besenbacher, as part of the annual banquet at the New Carlsberg Glyptotek on Sunday…

Professor Kaj Grønbæk has been appointed new head of department at Department of Computer Science. Photo: AU Pure

2018.08.31 |

New head of the Department at Computer Science

Professor Kaj Grønbæk has been appointed new head of department at Department of Computer Science from September 1, 2018.

Nuclear mRNAs carry an ‘A tail’ at their end. Under normal conditions (left panel) the protein Nab2 binds to the A tail and this protects the RNA against decay, which allows RNA to be exported to the cytoplasm with the help of Mex67. Under export block conditions (right panel), Nab2 binds to the A-tailed RNAs accumulating in the nucleus and therefore gets in short supply for protecting newly made RNA, which instead gets degraded already in the cell nucleus by enzymes attacking it from the A tail end. Figure: Manfred Schmid.

2018.08.29 |

New method uncovers the importance of keeping a good nuclear RNA hygiene

How cells translate their genetic information into functional RNA and protein is a central question in biology. Researchers from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University have invented a new technology to study regulatory principles of gene expression.

2018.08.24 |

Flirting flies: more than just winging it

Studies of the song of the fruit flies reveal new findings of how the neurons in the brain function. These results can be used to uncover new knowledge on how brains in general function which in the longer term may have medical significance.

A record number of new students were welcomed to Science and Technology on Wednesday, 22 August. Photo: Ida Marie Jensen, AU FOTO.
Dean Niels Christian Nielsen held his welcome speech for several groups of students. This is in the main hall. Photo: Ida Marie Jensen, AU FOTO.
As always, the TÅGEKAMMERET social and lecture association also took part in the welcome celebrations. Photo: Ida Marie Jensen, AU FOTO.
More than 300 'older' students made a huge contribution as tutors to help the new students to a successful start in their life at the university. The dean extended a special thank-you to them. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Foto.

2018.08.28 |

Record number of new students

On Wednesday, 22 August 2018, Science and Technology welcomed 1,832 new BSc and BEng students.

Photo: Colourbox

2018.08.28 |

Three projects focussing on clean water

What impact does the discharge of nutrients have on the pH balance in the sea and on eutrophication? Can more aquatic plants reduce nitrogen and phosphorus in watercourses and provide better water quality? These are just two of the questions Aarhus University will now help to answer with grants from the Velux Foundation totalling DKK 3.9 million.

The pictures show cancer cells that have been exposed to BE-43547 for six hours earlier and have received a green-fluorescent reagent that accumulates and changes the colour to red/yellow in the mitochondria with intact membrane tension. The difference between the two images is that the cells on the left had enough oxygen, while the cells to the right were deprived of oxygen. The lack of red/yellow colour shows that the mitochondrial membranes have been destroyed. The cancer cells are dead. Photo: Thomas B. Poulsen
Each of the two electron-microscope images shows a section of a cancer cell that has been deprived of oxygen for four hours, and a close-up of a mitochondrion in the relevant cell. The cell on the left has been treated with BE-43547, whereas the cell on the right has been treated with an inactive variant of the substance. The difference is clear: the Mitochondrial folded inner membranes (cristae) are intact in the cell to the right, while they have been destroyed in the suicidal cell to the left. Photo: Thomas B. Poulsen

2018.08.22 |

Natural substance makes cancer cells commit suicide

Researchers at Aarhus University have discovered that a natural substance can kill aggressive cancer cells in a new and effective way. The substance damages the power plants in cancer cells, the mitochondria, and initiates a suicidal process that seems to differ from known forms of programmed cell death, and which depends on the oxygen levels in…

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