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Sperm whales exemplify the evolutionary drive for highly intense echolocation – their nose is a massive sound generator that can take up as much as 1/3rd of the body size of an adult male. Photo: Chris Johnson.
Small toothed whales, like the harbor porpoise that is found in Danish waters, echolocate at much higher frequencies than large toothed whales, helping them maintain a narrow biosonar. Photo: Ecomare/Salko de Wolf [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

2018.11.15 |

A bigger nose, a bigger bang: size matters for echolocating toothed whales

Whales, dolphins, and porpoises have all evolved to use similar narrow beams of high intensity sound to echolocate prey. Far from being inefficient, this highly focused sense may have helped them succeed as top predators in the world's oceans.

An artist’s depiction of the iron meteorite hurtling through space before impacting in northwest Greenland. Grafics: NASA
Map of Greenland showing the location of the Hiawatha impact crater in Inglefield Land, along the northwest margin of the Greenland Ice sheet.
Close-up of the northwestern ice-sheet margin in Inglefield Land. The Hiawatha impact crater was discovered beneath the semi-circular ice margin. The structure is also imprinted on the shape of the ice surface, even though it lies nearly 1000 meters below the ice surface. Hiawatha is named after outlet glacier at the edge of the ice sheet. The name was given by Lauge Koch in 1922 during an expedition around northern Greenland, while thinking of the pre-colonial native American leader and co-founder of the Iroquois Confederacy. Grafics: NASA

2018.11.14 |

Massive impact crater from a kilometre-wide iron meteorite discovered in Greenland

An international team lead by researchers from University of Copenhagen and Aarhus University have discovered a 31-km wide meteorite impact crater buried beneath the ice-sheet in the northern Greenland. This is the first time that a crater of any size has been found under one of Earth’s continental ice sheets. The researchers worked for last three…

Professor Gregers Rom Andersen (left), Cryo-EM Facility Manager Thomas Boesen and Professor Poul Nissen in front of the Titan-Krios flagship microscope at Aarhus University (photo: Lisbeth Heilesen).

2018.11.08 |

DKK 30 million for high-tech electron microscopes for research in molecular cell biology

The Minister for Higher Education and Science has approved funding for three new research infrastructures, of which DKK 30.76 million goes to EMBION – a research infrastructure for cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) on biological materials.

2018.11.02 |

Researches develop new protein for prevention of influenza virus infection

An international research team has developed a new protein drug which has the potential to be used for protection against all types of influenza infection. By delivering the drug as a DNA vector it may also function as a universal influenza vaccine.

2018.11.01 |

New insight into the mechanism of the drug against sclerosis and psoriasis

A multidisciplinary research team at Aarhus University has provided fundamental new insight into the mechanism of the medical drug dimethyl fumarate, which is the active component of important treatments for multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The results contribute to the development of new strategies for drug discovery.

2018.11.01 |

Aarhus University new partner in major European innovation network in the food sector

Aarhus University has been appointed as a new partner in the EIT Food consortium. The EIT Food Consortium consists of over 50 partners from 13 European countries, including leading international food companies, research centers and universities.

New centre leader at iFOOD: Milena Corredig

2018.11.01 |

New centre leader at iFOOD

As of November 1, 2018, Milena Corredig is appointed as new Centre Leader for the iFOOD Aarhus University Centre for Innovative Food Research. Milena Corredig has a broad international experience in food research.

Jørgen Ellegaard Andersen is the first Danish researcher to be the corresponding Principal Investigator (cPI) on an ERC Synergy Grant, as well as the first scientist at Aarhus University to be involved in one. Photo: Christine Dilling, AU

2018.10.23 |

Jørgen Ellegaard Andersen wins € 10 million ERC Synergy Grant

The European Research Council (ERC) has granted an ERC Synergy Grant of 10 million Euros to the project “Recursive and Exact New Quantum Theory” (ReNewQuantum), with Professor Jørgen Ellegaard Andersen as the lead Principal Investigator (PI) with Centre for Quantum Geometry of Moduli spaces (QGM), Aarhus University, as corresponding host…

Using geophysical technology, the project will find a solution for calculating the flow of the cleaning agents below the ground, and the data will then be processed and transformed into a visual 3D model that guides the injection

2018.10.22 |

New innovation project to boost the use of biotechnology for the cleanup of contaminated soil

Ejlskov A / S and Aarhus University work together to develop a faster, cheaper and easier method for cleaning contaminated soil without the need for excavators. Real-time 3D scanning of the subsoil allows biotechnological cleansers to be injected accurately into the contaminated underground, as well as monitoring simultaneously how the cleansers…

The secretive indri (Indri indri) of Madagascar is the largest living lemur. It is also critically endangered and highly evolutionarily distinct with no close relatives, a combination that makes its branch one of most precarious on the mammal evolutionary tree. In the likely event that the indri goes extinct, we will lose 19 million years of unique evolutionary history from the mammal tree of life. Photo:©pierivb, Depositphotos.com
An illustration of how smaller mammals - here exemplified by a nutria - will have to diversify for the next 3-5 million years to restore the loss of the large mammals. Graphics: Matt Davis, Aarhus Universitet.
Litopterns, like this Macrauchenia patachonica discovered by Charles Darwin, were a strange looking group of prehistoric South American mammals that were not closely related to any species alive today–they diverged evolutionarily from other mammals over 65 million years ago. When they went extinct at the end of the Ice Age, the mammal Tree of Life lost one of its deepest branches. Illustration:Bruce Horsfall, Macmillan, New York. Via Wikimedia Commons

2018.10.15 |

Mammals cannot evolve fast enough to escape current extinction crisis

We humans are exterminating animal and plant species so quickly that nature's built-in defence mechanism, evolution, cannot keep up. An Aarhus-led research team calculated that if current conservation efforts are not improved, so many mammal species will become extinct during the next five decades that nature will need 3-5 million years to recover.

Maize is a crop that will find things more and more difficult as climate change gives us more drought during the summer. Here is a Danish maize field from July 2018. Photo: Janne Hansen

2018.10.16 |

Climate changes require better adaptation to drought

Europe’s future climate will be characterised by more frequent heat waves and more widespread drought. Heat and drought will both challenge crop production, but drought in particular will be a problem – especially for spring sown crops such as maize.

Sustainable forest management in Europe has only a modest effect on mitigating global climate change. Photo: Janne Hansen

2018.10.16 |

Can forests save us from climate change?

A new study published in Nature has found that managing Europe’s forests to maximise carbon sequestration has a negligible effect on the global climate.

Alexandre Anesio has been appointed a professor in Arctic biochemistry at the Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, from 1 November 2018. (Private photo).

2018.10.12 |

New professor researches microbial life on the surface of ice

Alexandre Anesio has been appointed Professor in Arctic Biochemistry at the Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University from 1 November 2018. He comes from a position at the University of Bristol.

2018.10.12 |

Goldilocks principle in biology – fine-tuning the ‘just right’ signal load

In the fairy tale "Goldilock and the Three Bears", the girl Goldilock goes to the bears’ house where she finds three bowls of porridge, but only one has the “just right” temperature, and in the same way within biology, you can find the "just right" conditions - called the Goldilocks principle.

A hoverfly (marked with a red square) pollinating white dryas in southern Greenland. The original idea is to use cameras with automatic insect recognition to register how climate change is affecting the interaction between plants and pollinating insects. Photo: Toke Thomas Høye
Toke Thomas Høye, senior researcher. Photo: Aarhus University

2018.10.11 |

Climate researcher from Aarhus University honoured for the original research idea of the year

Toke Thomas Høye, a senior researcher at the Department of Bioscience, becomes the first recipient of a new award from the Independent Research Fund Denmark for this year's original research idea.

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