News

Weaver ants excrete nutrient-rich waste when lured to the leaves of, for instance, coffee plants. Photo: Kim Aaen, NatureEyes.
The leaves of the coffee plant are full of small dark faecal droppings – ant waste containing urea and amino acids that the plants can absorb and exploit for growth. Photo: Joachim Offenberg.
The forest ants that were moved from the forest to an apple orchard immediately began to examine the apple trees in their new "home". Here on flower buds. Photo: Jens Henrik Petersen.
The forest ants immediately began to search for prey in the orchard’s apple trees. Here an ant has caught an insect pest – a winter moth larva. Photo: Jesper Stern Nielsen.

2017.08.31 |

Profitable cooperation: Ants protect and fertilise plants

In a new article, researchers from Aarhus University describe how the waste left by ants on plant leaves serves as a valuable fertiliser for the plants – handed on a silver platter.

(Photo: Colourbox)

2017.08.30 |

We hope your pot plant has had a pleasant trip

Danish gardeners produce 600 million pot plants every year. However, some of them suffer a sad fate en route from the greenhouse to the consumer’s window sill. Some of the culprits leading to the plant damage have been identified, and a research project at Aarhus University will now look at ways to reduce the waste in transit. A laboratory shaped…

2017.08.24 |

DNA sensor system developed for specific and sensitive measurement of cancer-relevant enzyme activity

The development of DNA sensor systems is of great importance for advances in medical science. Now another piece of the puzzle for the development of personalized medicine has been found with the results of a highly sensitive monitoring of cancer-related topoisomerase II enzymes.

Dean Niels Chr. Nielsen, Science and Technology, Aarhus University. Photo: Lars Kruse

2017.08.21 |

Investment in education provides digital skills

To keep up with technological development, there is a need for investment in education with a focus on digital technology, according to Dean Niels Chr. Nielsen, Science and Technology, in a contribution to debate.

Professor Bo Brummerstedt Iversen is director of iMAT, the strategic research centre at Aarhus University. (Photo: Rasmus Rørbæk)

2017.08.16 |

Aarhus University focuses on materials research for building the future

Developing new materials with special properties is of crucial importance for scientific progress in areas such as energy, construction, environmentally responsible technologies, transport and electronics. Aarhus University has therefore established the interdisciplinary Centre for Integrated Materials Research (iMAT), which opened on 15 August.…