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Sperm whales exemplify the evolutionary drive for highly intense echolocation – their nose is a massive sound generator that can take up as much as 1/3rd of the body size of an adult male. Photo: Chris Johnson.
Small toothed whales, like the harbor porpoise that is found in Danish waters, echolocate at much higher frequencies than large toothed whales, helping them maintain a narrow biosonar. Photo: Ecomare/Salko de Wolf [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

2018.11.15 |

A bigger nose, a bigger bang: size matters for echolocating toothed whales

Whales, dolphins, and porpoises have all evolved to use similar narrow beams of high intensity sound to echolocate prey. Far from being inefficient, this highly focused sense may have helped them succeed as top predators in the world's oceans.

An artist’s depiction of the iron meteorite hurtling through space before impacting in northwest Greenland. Grafics: NASA
Map of Greenland showing the location of the Hiawatha impact crater in Inglefield Land, along the northwest margin of the Greenland Ice sheet.
Close-up of the northwestern ice-sheet margin in Inglefield Land. The Hiawatha impact crater was discovered beneath the semi-circular ice margin. The structure is also imprinted on the shape of the ice surface, even though it lies nearly 1000 meters below the ice surface. Hiawatha is named after outlet glacier at the edge of the ice sheet. The name was given by Lauge Koch in 1922 during an expedition around northern Greenland, while thinking of the pre-colonial native American leader and co-founder of the Iroquois Confederacy. Grafics: NASA

2018.11.14 |

Massive impact crater from a kilometre-wide iron meteorite discovered in Greenland

An international team lead by researchers from University of Copenhagen and Aarhus University have discovered a 31-km wide meteorite impact crater buried beneath the ice-sheet in the northern Greenland. This is the first time that a crater of any size has been found under one of Earth’s continental ice sheets. The researchers worked for last three…

Professor Gregers Rom Andersen (left), Cryo-EM Facility Manager Thomas Boesen and Professor Poul Nissen in front of the Titan-Krios flagship microscope at Aarhus University (photo: Lisbeth Heilesen).

2018.11.08 |

DKK 30 million for high-tech electron microscopes for research in molecular cell biology

The Minister for Higher Education and Science has approved funding for three new research infrastructures, of which DKK 30.76 million goes to EMBION – a research infrastructure for cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) on biological materials.

2018.11.02 |

Researches develop new protein for prevention of influenza virus infection

An international research team has developed a new protein drug which has the potential to be used for protection against all types of influenza infection. By delivering the drug as a DNA vector it may also function as a universal influenza vaccine.

2018.11.01 |

New insight into the mechanism of the drug against sclerosis and psoriasis

A multidisciplinary research team at Aarhus University has provided fundamental new insight into the mechanism of the medical drug dimethyl fumarate, which is the active component of important treatments for multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The results contribute to the development of new strategies for drug discovery.

2018.11.01 |

Aarhus University new partner in major European innovation network in the food sector

Aarhus University has been appointed as a new partner in the EIT Food consortium. The EIT Food Consortium consists of over 50 partners from 13 European countries, including leading international food companies, research centers and universities.