News

Jørgen Ellegaard Andersen is the first Danish researcher to be the corresponding Principal Investigator (cPI) on an ERC Synergy Grant, as well as the first scientist at Aarhus University to be involved in one. Photo: Christine Dilling, AU

2018.10.23 |

Jørgen Ellegaard Andersen wins € 10 million ERC Synergy Grant

The European Research Council (ERC) has granted an ERC Synergy Grant of 10 million Euros to the project “Recursive and Exact New Quantum Theory” (ReNewQuantum), with Professor Jørgen Ellegaard Andersen as the lead Principal Investigator (PI) with Centre for Quantum Geometry of Moduli spaces (QGM), Aarhus University, as corresponding host…

Using geophysical technology, the project will find a solution for calculating the flow of the cleaning agents below the ground, and the data will then be processed and transformed into a visual 3D model that guides the injection

2018.10.22 |

New innovation project to boost the use of biotechnology for the cleanup of contaminated soil

Ejlskov A / S and Aarhus University work together to develop a faster, cheaper and easier method for cleaning contaminated soil without the need for excavators. Real-time 3D scanning of the subsoil allows biotechnological cleansers to be injected accurately into the contaminated underground, as well as monitoring simultaneously how the cleansers…

The secretive indri (Indri indri) of Madagascar is the largest living lemur. It is also critically endangered and highly evolutionarily distinct with no close relatives, a combination that makes its branch one of most precarious on the mammal evolutionary tree. In the likely event that the indri goes extinct, we will lose 19 million years of unique evolutionary history from the mammal tree of life. Photo:©pierivb, Depositphotos.com
An illustration of how smaller mammals - here exemplified by a nutria - will have to diversify for the next 3-5 million years to restore the loss of the large mammals. Graphics: Matt Davis, Aarhus Universitet.
Litopterns, like this Macrauchenia patachonica discovered by Charles Darwin, were a strange looking group of prehistoric South American mammals that were not closely related to any species alive today–they diverged evolutionarily from other mammals over 65 million years ago. When they went extinct at the end of the Ice Age, the mammal Tree of Life lost one of its deepest branches. Illustration:Bruce Horsfall, Macmillan, New York. Via Wikimedia Commons

2018.10.15 |

Mammals cannot evolve fast enough to escape current extinction crisis

We humans are exterminating animal and plant species so quickly that nature's built-in defence mechanism, evolution, cannot keep up. An Aarhus-led research team calculated that if current conservation efforts are not improved, so many mammal species will become extinct during the next five decades that nature will need 3-5 million years to recover.

Maize is a crop that will find things more and more difficult as climate change gives us more drought during the summer. Here is a Danish maize field from July 2018. Photo: Janne Hansen

2018.10.16 |

Climate changes require better adaptation to drought

Europe’s future climate will be characterised by more frequent heat waves and more widespread drought. Heat and drought will both challenge crop production, but drought in particular will be a problem – especially for spring sown crops such as maize.

Sustainable forest management in Europe has only a modest effect on mitigating global climate change. Photo: Janne Hansen

2018.10.16 |

Can forests save us from climate change?

A new study published in Nature has found that managing Europe’s forests to maximise carbon sequestration has a negligible effect on the global climate.

Alexandre Anesio has been appointed a professor in Arctic biochemistry at the Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, from 1 November 2018. (Private photo).

2018.10.12 |

New professor researches microbial life on the surface of ice

Alexandre Anesio has been appointed Professor in Arctic Biochemistry at the Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University from 1 November 2018. He comes from a position at the University of Bristol.

2018.10.12 |

Goldilocks principle in biology – fine-tuning the ‘just right’ signal load

In the fairy tale "Goldilock and the Three Bears", the girl Goldilock goes to the bears’ house where she finds three bowls of porridge, but only one has the “just right” temperature, and in the same way within biology, you can find the "just right" conditions - called the Goldilocks principle.

A hoverfly (marked with a red square) pollinating white dryas in southern Greenland. The original idea is to use cameras with automatic insect recognition to register how climate change is affecting the interaction between plants and pollinating insects. Photo: Toke Thomas Høye
Toke Thomas Høye, senior researcher. Photo: Aarhus University

2018.10.11 |

Climate researcher from Aarhus University honoured for the original research idea of the year

Toke Thomas Høye, a senior researcher at the Department of Bioscience, will today become the first recipient of a new award from the Independent Research Fund Denmark for this year's original research idea.

Jacob Sherson has been awarded the Grundfos Prize for 2018. (Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Photo.)

2018.10.12 |

Bigger. More. Better.

Professor Jacob Sherson has a mission; he want to reinvent the way computers and humans interact. He’s reinvented himself a few times along the way, and today he says he’s a sort of version 3.0 of himself. The physicist has now been awarded the 2018 Grundfos Prize of DKK 1 mill. for his work on the interface between human and machine

The students here are building mini drones under expert supervision from Associate Professor Erdal Kayacan. Photo: Jesper Bruun.

2018.10.11 |

Sustainability on the curriculum for 370 pupils

Perhaps the Danish high-school students who know most about sustainability. At all events, 370 students from Aarhus Tech now know a little more after hearing about the latest knowledge and technology last Friday at a theme day at Aarhus University.

At the AU annual celebration in 2015, Sir Gregory Winter was appointed an honorary doctor at Aarhus University following a nomination from Science and Technology. He was presented with the doctorate by Dean Niels Christian Nielsen, Science and Technology. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Photo.

2018.10.09 |

Honorary doctor at Aarhus University receives Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Sir Gregory Winter has been awarded a quarter of this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on antibodies. He has been working with AU researchers for many years, and in 2015 he was appointed an honorary doctor at Aarhus University, Science and Technology.

Researchers from Aarhus University have developed an improved method for following the transport of chemicals through the soil. Photo: Janne Hansen

2018.10.03 |

Following the path of chemicals through the soil

A new and quick way to predict the transport of chemicals through the soil has been developed by researchers at Aarhus University.