News

Figure: Søren Lykke-Andersen.

2018.09.19 |

Co-evolution between a "parasite gene" and its host

A Danish research team has delineated a complex symbiosis between a ‘parasitic’ noncoding RNA gene and its protein coding ‘host’ gene in human cells.

2018.09.17 |

Advanced fluorescence microscopy reveals new aspects of protein pathways on the ribosome

The protein called translation elongation factor EF-Tu is a well-known player in the protein synthesis process. A new scientific article describes novel aspects of this well-described protein, which appears to play an even more important role in securing the accuracy of translation than previously assumed. The results may have an influence on the…

2018.09.17 |

Evolutionary biologist Tove Hedegaard Jørgensen awarded Prize of Honour for Pedagogics

Associate Professor Tove Hedegaard Jørgensen from the Department of Bioscience and ST Learning Lab has been awarded the The Aarhus University Anniversary Foundation Prize of Honour for Pedagogics in recognition of outstanding and groundbreaking teaching. The award is accompanied by a DKK 100,000 monetary award.

2018.09.17 |

Student of IT product development awarded Her Majesty Queen Margrethe II’s Travel Grant

At Aarhus University's annual celebration 2018, Karl-Emil Bilstrup, who is a master's degree student in IT product development, was awarded Her Majesty Queen Margrethe II’s Travel Grant of DKK 25,000. Read more about him and the other three award winners.

2018.09.17 |

Populations geneticist awarded honorary doctorate at AU

Professor Andrew G. Clark from Cornell University has been awarded an honorary doctorate from Aarhus University for his impressive research work on population genetics and genomics over the last 40 years.

You have to go against the flow and turn ideas upside down if you want to attract the attention of the VILLUM Experiment programme. Eight AU researchers have been able to do just this, and together they will be receiving DKK 15.3 million. (Ill: Colourbox)

2018.09.18 |

Experiments worth millions

The Villum Foundation is supporting bold technical and scientific research ideas for the second time. Researchers from Aarhus University are again on the list of recipients, with eight daring ideas totalling DKK 15.3 million.

AU researchers have completed a new successful screening strategy where they have identified novel inhibitors of αlpha-synuclein aggregation. This may help develop a cure for Parkinson's disease. (Image: Colourbox.com)
Graphical overview of a screening of 746,000 compounds for inhibitory effects of alpha-synuclein aggregation. (Graphics: Professor Daniel Otzen)

2018.09.11 |

New high-throughput screening study may pave the way for future Parkinson’s disease therapy

Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease; currently there is no cure. Aggregation of the protein α-synuclein plays a key role in this disease. Together with a US drug company, AU researchers have now carried out a new screening strategy which has identified novel and structurally diverse aggregation inhibitors.

2018.09.10 |

Molecular switches are not just "on" or "off"

It is not always easy to see if a switch is on or off! A new study shows that the same can be true of a molecular switch. This knowledge gives a new insight into the molecular switches, the GTPases, many of which have medical potential.

Professor Poul Nissen (Photo: The Carlsberg Foundation)

2018.09.03 |

Poul Nissen awarded the Carlsberg Foundation Research Prize 2018

Poul Nissen receives the Carlsberg Foundation Research Prize for his groundbreaking work in structural biology. The prize was given by HRH the Crown Princess, Minister of Higher Education and Science, Tommy Ahlers, and chairman of the Carlsberg Foundation, Flemming Besenbacher, as part of the annual banquet at the New Carlsberg Glyptotek on Sunday…