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On the raw electron micrographs (A), one can find the individual protein molecules (green boxes). By taking an average of thousands of such similarly oriented particles, one can get sharp two-dimensional images (B), from which one can calculate the protein's three-dimensional structure (C). Finally, one can interpret this result by building a model of the protein (D). Image: Milena Timcenko.

2019.06.28 |

Groundbreaking cryo-electron microscopy at Aarhus University reveals the first structures of a protein that maintains cell membranes

Using cutting-edge electron microscopy, researchers from Aarhus University have determined the first structures of a lipid-flippase. The discoveries provide a better understanding of the basics of how cells work and stay healthy, and can eventually increase our knowledge of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

Green biomass has great potential as an alternative to traditional sources of protein. Hear more about the future perspectives at the conference on 25 to 27 June 2019. Photo: Anders Trærup.

2019.06.25 |

International conference at AU to put a stop to the use-and-throw-away culture

On 25 June, Aarhus University will be opening the doors to Circular Bioeconomy Days 2019. A three-day international conference focusing on developing the circular bioeconomy of the future.

A lot of water has gone under the bridge in agriculture in the past 125 years, but there is still valuable knowledge to be gleaned from the long-term manure experiments at Askov Research Station. The trials have run without interruption all that time. Stock photo

2019.06.17 |

Askov long-term field experiments continue to create trailblazing knowledge

At Askov Experimental Station, 125 years of continued nutrient applications at different rates and from different sources have created a unique research platform used by Danish and international experts from widely different research areas.

Nina Lock and Troels Skrydstrup conduct research in two different research groups, but they work together on a joint endeavour: to develop sustainable catalysts that can convert CO2 into valuable resources. Photo: Dorthe Lundh
In Nina Lock's research group, the aim is to be able to capture a flue gas mixture from a chimney, drive it straight into a major facility, and convert some of the CO2 into valuable building blocks that can be reused by industry. Photo: Colourbox

2019.06.13 |

CO2 could replace fossil fuels in industry

Researchers at Aarhus University are developing new chemical technologies to reduce CO2 emissions and support the green transition in both public and private manufacturing companies.