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A new study from Aarhus University shows that children who grow up surrounded by low amounts of green space have up to 55% higher risk of developing a mental disorder later in life. According to the researchers, integration of green space in urban planning is important to ensure green and healthy cities for the future generations. Model photo: Colourbox.dk.

2019.02.25 |

Being surrounded by green space in childhood may improve mental health of adults

Children who grow up without green surroundings have up to 55% higher risk of developing various mental disorders later in life. This is shown by a new study from Aarhus University, emphasizing the need for designing green and healthy cities for the future.

Lars Henrik Andersen, professor and former department head, will become acting dean of the Faculty of Science and Technology. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Photo

2019.02.08 |

Lars Henrik Andersen has been named acting dean of ST

Lars Henrik Andersen, professor and former department head, will become acting dean of the Faculty of Science and Technology when Niels Christian Nielsen steps down on 15 February. He will be responsible for managing the faculty throughout the process leading up to its possible split-up.

The tachinid fly (Phasia hemiptera). Photo: Ole Martin
Four-banded longhorn beetle (Leptura quadrifasciata). Photo: Ole Martin
The butterfly European skipper (Thymelicus lineola). Photo: Ole Martin

2019.02.08 |

DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors

Researchers from Aarhus University have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. This newly developed eDNA method holds a vast potential for documenting unknown insect-plant interactions, keeping track of endangered pollinators, such as wild bees and butterflies, as well as in the management of unwanted pest…

Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Foto

2019.02.07 |

Rector: AU should have five faculties instead of four

The Faculty of Science and Technology at Aarhus University has grown so large that the rector is now proposing to split it into two faculties. The goal in doing so would be to make the dean’s leadership task more manageable, which in turn would improve quality and create better balance at the university as a whole. In this connection, Dean Nielsen…

The new project has partners from all over Europe, and senior researcher Claus Grøn Sørensen anticipates, the project will contribute to fewer foreign agents in organic farming. Photo: Peer Klercke.

2019.02.28 |

Millions for purely organic

It may well be a nice idea to buy organic, but you can never be sure that the products you buy really are 100% organic. A major new EU project is tackling this problem by making organic farms more organic.

Dean Niels Christian Nielsen stresses that the university is playing an important role in work on the UN SDGs. (AU Photo)
There was a full House at the "Partnerships for a Sustainable Future” conference held in the Main Hall at Aarhus University (AU photo)
Partnerships for a Sustainable Future (AU Photo)

2019.02.06 |

Focus on the UN Sustainable Development Goals

Research and education at Science and Technology point directly towards the themes in the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This enables the faculty to play a key role in developing solutions to major global challenges. How the university supports the SDGs and sustainability is therefore a very important focal point.

The Carlsberg Foundation grants DKK 200 million to new Semper Ardens projects. Graphics: Carlsbergfondet
Professor Jeffrey S. Hangst, Department of Physics and Astronomy, receives 20.1 million DKK. Photo: Aarhus University
Professor Thomas Pohl, Department of Physics and Astronomy, receives 15.2 million DKK. Photo: Aarhus University
Professor Troels Skrydstrup, Department of Chemistry and iNANO, who receives 7.5 million DKK. Photo: Aarhus University

2019.02.01 |

Three Semper Ardens grants to Science and Technology researchers

The researchers get about 43 million DKK in total to go into depth with antimatter, examine the ultimate optical control of the light, and to develop improved plastic recycling.

Jesper Buus Nielsen, professor and centre director. Photo: Mette B. Klausen

2019.01.31 |

DKK 50 million for non-targeted research into better blockchain technology

The Concordium Blockchain Research Centre at the Department of Computer Science, Aarhus University opens on 1 February 2019. The centre will be researching into blockchain technology, with focus on security, transparency and general usability. The Concordium Foundation is donating funding of DKK 50 million (EUR 6.6 million) over five years.

On Thursday, the live video from ISS showed Aarhus University's first satellite, Delphini-1, being deployed into space. This means that Aarhus University is now officially a space university. Photo: NASA and NanoRacks

2019.01.31 |

AU is now officially a space university

Thursday 31 January, at exactly 13:00, Aarhus University officially entered the line of universities in the world that have a satellite in space. Delphini-1 was deployed from the International Space Station, ISS, into its orbit. The Delphini-1 team will now try to establish contact with the satellite.

2019.01.31 |

Aarhus University puts the UN Sustainable Development Goals on the map

Aarhus University is to hold a conference on the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The conference will bring together key players in our continued cooperation with the outside world to get deep and broad knowledge out into society. Connie Hedegaard will be the keynote speaker at the "Partnerships for a sustainable future - on the UN Sustainable…

Three researchers receive DKK 31 million (EUR 4.1 million) for sophisticated research equipment. Photo: Novo Nordisk Foundation

2019.01.31 |

DKK 31 million from the Novo Nordisk Foundation for advanced research technology

With major investments in laboratory equipment funded by the Novo Nordisk Foundation, three researchers from Aarhus University have been able to boost their research into proteins, nanoparticles and biological molecules.

Minister for Environment and Food, Jakob Ellemann-Jensen opened the Biodiversity Symposium together with Dean Niels Christian Nielsen, Science and Technology (AU Foto)
From the left: Flemming Skov (Department of Bioscience), Kurt Nielsen (Vice-dean, Science and Technology), Jakob Ellemann-Jensen (Minister for Environment and Food), Niels Chr. Nielsen (Dean, Science and Technology) (AU Foto)
The Biodiversity Symposium 2019 was a popular event in the Lakeside Lecture Theatres at Aarhus University. (AU Foto)

2019.01.31 |

Growing interest in Danish biodiversity

An impressive more than 400 people turned up to the fifth Biodiversity Symposium, held at Aarhus University on 22 January. Researchers, managers, consultants and policy-makers gathered to take stock of biodiversity in the Danish countryside. The good attendance bears witness to a large and increasing interest in the topic.

A research group has just elucidated the structure of a sugar transport protein that is unique to plants. The new structure can help explain how plant organs - such as pollen - develop properly, and give ideas as to why some subspecies of wheat are resistant to fungal attacks. Figures: Bjørn Panyella Pedersen.

2019.01.31 |

New insight into unique sugar transport in plants

A small research group at Aarhus University has just elucidated the structure of a sugar transport protein that is unique to plants. The new structure can help explain how plant organs - such as pollen - develop properly, and give ideas as to why some subspecies of wheat are resistant to fungal attacks.

Associate Professor Wolf Eisenhardt, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University. Photo: VILLUM FONDEN.
Associate Professor Jan Frahm, Department of Mathematics, Aarhus University. Photo: VILLUM FONDEN.

2019.01.22 |

VILLUM FOUNDATION grants awarded to two young AU researchers

Wolf Eiserhardt from the Department of Bioscience and Jan Frahm from the Department of Mathematics have each received a Villum Young Investigator grant of 10 mill. DKK.

The photograph shows Carl, an alpha-male chimpanzee at Copenhagen Zoo, and one of the participants in the study. Photo: Copenhagen Zoo, David Trood

2019.01.22 |

Human mutation rate has slowed recently

Researchers from Aarhus University and Copenhagen Zoo have discovered that the human mutation rate is significantly slower than for our closest primate relatives. The new knowledge may be important for estimates of when the common ancestor for humans and chimpanzees lived - and for conservation of large primates in the wild.

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